Studio visit with Mary Ann Peters by sierra stinson

Mary Ann Peter's is an artist based in Seattle who thinks in a global scale. She recently was just down the street from my work creating one of her 'impossible monuments' I stopped by on a lunch break to see what she was constructing

There were two parts to this piece, floating above and delicately rendered below.

More of Mary Ann's work can be found here www.maryann-peters.com

 

A Woman is always an Island by sierra stinson

Longtime friend and collaborator Serrah Russell asked me to be in her next series 'A Woman is always an Island' We drove out to my favorite swimming spot at Lake Washington on a cold February morning and I jumped in.

More images from her series here

post swim - photo by Serrah Russell

post swim - photo by Serrah Russell

 

great leaps or lung collapses

i wanted to laugh at the scene but it was too beautiful                                               

i wanted to laugh at myself but i was too vulnerable                               

my body isn't my body anymore it's changed this year and i look at it like a foreign landscape

So I lept                                                      and I sunk deep into the iciness drifting down

then up to the surface                     i float
my breath was cut in half and i couldn't gasp or make out words                                       there wasn't enough oxygen
it was colder then cold

i waded and paddled              i thought about how i've never been a good swimmer                               how i've never spent enough time in the water
how i am afraid of this world
of risk                                                     of leaving the comfort of my city
of my home                                                     of my state of being

how i am not mighty

and i don't get to decide.                           here.                                            every limb desensitized

purple and pink flesh

my middle finger is still numb slightly                                                                                appropriately so

 

Q&A Glasswing by sierra stinson

I was interviewed by the lovely team over at Glasswing, their boutique is beautiful and they are constantly introducing the community to brilliant designers and creatives.

"I'm drawn to artists that are very driven and create works that resonate with them in the moment, as humans, rather than perhaps what they think the world needs or what galleries would prefer. I appreciate works that are true to the artist and in some way are a reflection of themselves. I gravitate to creators that take risks and are willing to do works that are site specific. And I definitely appreciate artists that don't work within just one medium and are willing to try mediums that they aren't necessarily familiar with. Going on studio visits and seeing the direction and progression artists are taking at that given moment is a very fascinating experience. I love that within a few years someone can take a completely different direction in their work."

Read more here

 

 

 
Photos by Forest Eckley

Photos by Forest Eckley

 

Chamber Music by sierra stinson

I was in group exhibition Chamber Music at the Frye Art Museum curated by Scott Lawrimore. Each artist was asked to create a piece based off of one of the compositions by James Joyce's Chamber Music. I selected XXI and created a photo collage of torn polaroids as well as an inventory of each artist I have worked with in the region, including notes of if they were deceased or have departed Seattle.

Lightly come or lightly go:
Though thy heart presage thee woe,
Vales and many a wasted sun,
Oread let thy laughter run
Till the irreverent mountain air
Ripple all thy flying hair.

 

Lightly, lightly—ever so:
Clouds that wrap the vales below
At the hour of evenstar
Lowliest attendants are;
Love and laughter song-confessed
When the heart is heaviest.

           — James Joyce

 

 

 

And I’ll Be Satisfied Not to Read in between the Lines, 2013.

Polaroid 600 and acetate. 15 1/2 x 10 1/2 in.